Omrr – Devils for my Darling.

Omrr is Egyptian musician Omar El Abd. Based in Cairo his music is “based on glitch, noise, micro-sounds, sampling and field recordings. He uses a variety of instruments and software to create free form, dynamic and dense sonic landscapes. After previously releasing “Music for the Anxious” on Eileen Rec he has joined Russian label Dronarivm for his latest album.

Designed as an imaginary love story, the album was recorded, mixed, mastered and all instruments played by El Abd in 2017. And what a sonicly dense and clean release it is. For the amount of sound sources being used there is no feeling of claustrophobia, with sounds being crisp, vibrant and allowing a lot of space.

“Quicksands” sets the tone for the variation of sound sources to be heard across the album. Granular glitches, Electroacoustic sound sources, field recordings, some sort of hand played instrument, possibly kalimba being semi-randomly played. The broken beat nature gives the track a start. Sounds whirl in from the nether, pulsing around as the (let’s go with) kalimba starts playing out an off kilter looped melody that brings on Synth pulses which usher in a more composed glitch section that swirls around the listeners ears, chimes clang, metal sounds shimmer, the Synth pulses continue, ambient layers float, bells are struck, cornet blows and it’s almost like a storm is blowing around the kalimba loops. Sonically there is much to take on, such is the richness of sound sources, but this engages the listener and gives them elements to focus on and the rest to explore over repeated listens.

“Ink we Spill” glitch sounds and field recordings begin this track with an assortment of electronics, bells, buzzing drones, cut up fractured recordings, acoustic guitar slowly building up with the glitchy electronics and field recordings dominating the sound palate while the acoustic guitar plays a reflective piece. The construction of the many electronic layers makes it quite easy to miss when elements drop in and out. The acoustic guitar stops around when the electronics have gone from alarming to a more field recording storm like drone sound scape which washes out the remainder of the track.

“Illicit” dark drones, field recordings of nature, ominous tones, industrial like sound sources, static come together piece by piece to take the album in a different direction. This is pure drone that had not truly been heard before. The levels build up slowly creating a wall of sound and noise that becomes a mixture of drones, static squall and some sort of distant repetitive alarm that is warning people of something. If this is a love story, maybe this track signifies that something is wrong or is breaking down.

“Aquiver” brings the tone slightly lighter than the previous track. The drones are sharp, but not overbearing. The pattern percussive glitches sounds pop in out of the field of listening, electronics pulse and scatter to leave piano that is accompanied by very subtle mixtures of glitches, static, electronics and drones. The focus is the piano, but the other elements tease in another direction which surprisingly goes where you don’t expect. Big drones reminiscent of some modern classical drone pieces fill up the sonic landscape with the every present broken glitchy electronics scattering about. We return to the piano, this time accompanied by static and field recordings which take over the sound scape and leads the track in another direction. Mutated ambience with a melodic edge floats around recordings of presumably downtown Cairo with a percussive edge to them with beats, people clapping and sonic degradation.

“Your Heartless Sky” old age melodies, maybe from a 78, make way for manipulated electronics and bell sounds, while glitches flicker in and out, vocal snippets vanish as soon as they appear. Mournful melodic drones float above while the sonic landcsape has been joined by guitar, shakers, fragments of horn like sounds, cut up sections that sound like some sort of transmissions. The track comes across as an a Electroacoustic collage of sounds. I cannot personally put down a theme for it, but then by not achieving that, the piece remains open-ended for interpretation.

“Rotten Sky” a fusion of granular glitches, scattershot sounds, echoing noises, reverberating sounds leads on to a piano motif that is short before pulses and field recordings intertwined with drones swirl around creating levels of sounds before the piano returns minimally. The contrast between the minimalist piano which is gently played and the sonic ephemera surrounding it is noticeable. The dark ambient/Electroacoustic mix is the primary focus. As the album has progressed along it has gotten noticeably darker with this being the darkest track.

“Eloquent” acoustic guitar mixed with field recording, string like drone sections, glitched recordings, looped recordings of a person panting, kalimba, chimes, build up for the majority of the track before the music switches to a more kalimba – like melodic section still paired with the looped panting, drones and metallic electronic sounds that sound like metal shavings being swept up. If you take away the majority of the instruments for the most part of the track the string drone and ambient sections would be for some enough.

For this release Omrr has created a deep Electroacoustic release with elements of Glitch, Ambient, Drone and Modern Classical. While I am not sure I follow the narrative of the love story, the release is engaging with its great amount of sound sources within each track. It would be interesting to see what Omrr could achieve with a restriction on the amount of sound sources at his disposal and how that would affect the construction of his music. For a Sonically rich album it would be hard to find something as vibrant as this album. A mention should go to the great artwork of Francisca Pageo.

 

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Akira Kosemura – In the Dark Woods.

Akira Kosemura would be a familiar name to those who love exquisite piano based music. He has released on the likes of Someone Good and his on label Schole which is also has been home to the likes of Haruka Nakamura, Flica, Ghost and Tape and others. Such is the popularity that Kosemura has gained over the years with his exceptional music that he has some 473,000 Soundcloud and over 357,000 monthly Spotify listeners. This particular album was released on vinyl, CD+DVD and on the Schole/ 1631 Recordings labels.

The press release states: Treasuring a serene feeling and an intimate conversation with oneself.” is the main concept of his new work, which recalls a vivid emotions, as music goes into one’s body and feels a blood flow deep into a heart. As indicated in the title, an entire album is filled with an obscure darkness and a world of misty sounds never to be feared of, like a comfortable quietness in the dark where a child in the womb is hearing mother’s heartbeat. As the music goes on, it gradually begin to widen an introspective worldview. The combined sounds of repeated phrases as seen in minimal music method, a sophisticated crossover sound in between acoustics and electronics, and an improvisational solo piano will present the worldview suggestive of a broad theme, such as a circulation of life or the law of nature.”

The album feels like an album within an album within an album. There are many styles and territories that Kosemura covers from solo minimalist piano to Sci-fi Synth explorations to Ambient detours to Haunting Modern Classical with occasional bleeding of these styles within tracks. Naturally the standout ones are the solo piano which shows Kosemura at the top of his field and if you’ve been following the artists covered in this blog in the same field (Stefano Guzzetti, Roberto Attanasio, Lorenzo Masotto, Dominique Charpentier, etc…), there is a lot of talented musicians/composers out there.

The album opens with “DNA” a meditative piece combining delicate lighter keys played with restraint under which more strident repetitive playing that has a hypnotic feel. Accompanying this is the sound of what appears to be sonar blips, low-level drones, bells and the natural sound of the piano from the keys and hammers which gives the track an organic and natural feel. The track makes a statement for the pieces to come with its variation and use of mixed elements.

This is followed by “Resonance” that continues in the natural recording style of the piano, presumably down to the placement of microphones to pick up the nuances of the instrument. It’s quite an intimate piece with an almost sing songy flow to it. Due to its short two-minute nature it comes across as an interlude or a bridge track.

“Between the Trees” follows the recording techniques set out before, but the sound has a bit more urgency in it. The playing is more intense with the piece feeling a need to convey or communicate with the listener, to get their attention. The track starts with ominous bass notes that make a return mid track, but make way for more melodic notes with a glacial haze to them. You can easily see this type of track in a soundtrack situation with its repeating theme coming full circle.

“Sphere” is where Kosemura goes interstellar with a Synth track that oscillates, has a jazzy lightly flowing section where you feel that his fingers are barely touching the keys as he floats over them. The contrast in the piece is the Synth oscillating loops are at odds with the seemingly improvises jazzy section. An ice-cold slice of ambience joins in bringing to this fore a hammering section of Synth that fully fits the interstellar vibe with its definite Sci-fi Synth prog feel.

“Kaleidoscope of Happiness” returns to the themes set our previous with the piano driven tracks. Feeling like a relative of “Resonance” you can see why Kosemura has done soundtrack work before as his compositions are a perfect accompaniment for visuals. There is a light feeling of remorse with the track, but not over the top melancholy as there is hope in the second section.

“Inside River #1” and “Inside River #2” are cut from the same cloth, but there are variations within them. The tones of the tracks are slightly different with “Inside River #2” at times feeling a bit muted in sound, but also a bit more intense. This could simply be down to the recording or also Kosemura’s playing.

“Shadows” picks up the speed in playing with the hammers jostling in the sound mix. The track is a mix of high and lower notes with the lower notes being subtle in the mix. When the track enters the final minute you see the intensity and volume peak as Kosemura brings the track to the precipice and stops just before it falls of the cliff.

“Dedicated to Laura Palmer” is a static drenched hazy ambient Synth exploration. There are beds of loops that float in and out, layers of Synth pulses, what sounds like treated electric guitar, glacial tones and hints of the theme music to the TV show by Angelo Badalamenti. The track is a mixture of 70’s ambience with a retro/futurist feel.

“Moving” is a bright hope filled track that uses its lower tones in an ambient fashion with what sound like crickets chirping in the distance. The playing has an intensity that fits the feel of the piece in that it is neither to slow or too fast. At under a minute this is a nice vignette.

“Snowy Sky” is full of field recordings of what sounds like rope scraping across wood like on a boat where the rope is being tightened. Half of the sound palate comes from this and accompanying piano sounds, while the rest comes from the actual piano keys which are melodic and have while comfortingly familiar offer a different feel and mood to that of the previous tracks. Going back to previous tracks on the album I can’t say its reminiscent of others which is a positive thing.

“Spark” opens with an ambient slice alongside minimalist piano with percussive chimes that vaguely bring back the sonar sound of “DNA”. The piano while central to the piece is not the core instrument as the chimes and the ambience make up equal sound to the track. A meditative piece on repetition could with the relaxed nature a reference to the meditative practice of thinking about situations and going over things in your mind which would link up with the album’s theme of Treasuring a serene feeling and an intimate conversation with oneself.”

“Innocence” has Kosemura hammering keys building up opposing sections of the faster lower keys with the spaced out minimalist higher keys creating that juxtaposition of sound and intensity. It brings two opposing styles to bring about different textures and moods. With a track titled “Innocence” I would have expected a more subdued relaxed and ambient-esque track, but I guess the purity is in the spaced out keys.

“The Cycle of Nature” sees Kosemura at his most intense with the fast repeating phrasing joined by what could be water, but is more certainly the hammers and pedals of the piano, a wash of (natural) ambience enters in bringing together another movement which features electronic keys that shimmer across another layer of piano bringing around four layers of keys together. Everything drops out for a brief section bringing it back to the beginning and erupting again with a massive Synth burst of ambience that hovers over everything before the track delightfully fades to silence.

“Stillness of the Holy Place” is the albums epic track clocking in just under ten minutes in length and has a more studio controlled recording where the only thing you hear is the keys and not so much the other elements of the piano (they are there, just not so pronounced) . By having this type of recording the track comes across grandly. There is a sense of control of the piece where you feel that there is a narrative at play. Half way through the track other piano elements come into the sound more clearly. There are several movements with in the track where the intensity shifts from almost calm to more strident, from more meditative to freeform, etc… I personally am not sure what the narrative is and for me the shorter tracks work better than this long one.

“In the Dark Woods” bringing the Modern Classical side into play. Layers of complimenting violin, viola, contrabass and cello cross over each other filling up with sound that is epic in scale and rich with emotion, melancholy and sweeping gestures. Slowly the layering builds up with intensity rising in a way filling up the sound and making the surroundings shrink which is what I presume the title is referring to.

“Letter from a Distance” brings the album to the end where Kosemura returns to the delicateness of solo piano that he has demonstrated throughout the album. After going epic on the second and third last tracks, we see the sublime playing lead out as if over the final credits of a movie, book ending the album and reinforcing the mastery of delicate, subtle, emotional piano pieces in the of Kosemura.

Throughout the album Kosemura has demonstrated why he has such a following. For some a strictly solo piano album could be too much of a same thing, but for Kosemura he knows how to construct an album that can sound familiar but you look back to the other tracks you cannot pin point which track it is. Naturally with a genre like Modern Classical /Solo piano that is fast becoming a saturated one, it helps to be a great composer and this is what Kosemura has on his side. Add to the fact that Kosemura doesn’t just rely on Piano and you have an artist that sustains the listeners interest and keeps them engaged.

Johnny Bell and the Visitors – A Visitor’s Anthem / The Die Four.

The tag line of this blog would indicate that this particular release would probably not fit in these confines. But then several others featured thus far could be considered in the same situation. There are small elements of drone, but not in the usual style accustomed here. I mentioned this to Johnny in an email exchange. I also mentioned my admiration for artists who go out and release their own material without seeking a label to do it for them. This is what Johnny Bell has done for this two-track 7″ limited to 200 copies and wrapped in a custom-made letter press sleeve.

For this release Johnny Bell has been joined by Will Dyar on drums and Ben Montgomery on Trumpet. Both tracks have two feet in the Americana movement (which is defined by Americana Music Association “contemporary music that incorporates elements of various mostly acoustic American roots music styles, including country, roots-rock, folk and bluegrass resulting in a distinctive roots-oriented sound that lives in a world apart from the pure forms of the genres upon which it may draw. While acoustic instruments are often present and vital, Americana also often uses a full electric band”), but also are quite different from each other. Johnny Bell himself states the music is “a sparse and understated integration of clawhammer banjo, odd time signatures and experimental horn melodies. The music embodies the desolation and vast expanse of the high desert of Santa Fe. New Mexico. These are the new sounds of America’s Southwest.”

“A Visitor’s Anthem” begins with a feedback like drone accompanied by finger picking banjo (playing clawhammer banjo the picking is downwards) and lightly, but mid paced, brushed drumming before the long haunting and slightly desolate trumpet blows in. Another layer of Banjo this time appearing to be strummed, joins in adding an extra layer of sound and instigates the track picking up the intensity which is then matched with the pounding of the drums. The trumpet carries the melodic line and works as more the lead instrument over which the bed of drums and percussion are working in tandem mirroring each other. When this trumpet drops out the playing changes intensity and returns to a similar picked/strummed territory as the beginning which allows space for the trumpet to return to it’s more haunting longer notes. The banjo with its layering of strummed and picking gives it more a percussive/rhythmical feel than a lead instrument and with the drumming being brush driven gives the two elements a more percussive feel.

“The Die Four” picked Banjo with a lo-fi type quality is joined by shakers and what sounds like mallet played percussion and trumpet. In this case the trumpet is more freeform  in its lines weaving in and out. The focus on the track is more in the variation in the banjo which appears to be both picked and more hand strummed than plectrum strummed. The changes in the track are generated by the banjo, while the percussion remains similar in its tribalist nature. The feeling of this track is different to its flip. While the previous track had a more driving and dare I say a ‘rock’ based format this is more like a ‘campfire jam’ with an old west feel. In the background in sections there appear to be other percussive elements like gongs (my guess) which are buried in the mix, but add a percussive element similar to the use of cymbals.

Although not the style of music I would typically listen to (the closest comparison in my collection to the style would be The Dirty Three), Johnny Bell and the Visitors have released a 7″ of music that opens your ears to a different style and culture.

Adrian Lane – Playing With Ghosts.

On his Fourth album, the follow-up to “Branches Never Remember”, on the Preserved Sound label (the home to all of his albums), Adrian Lane uses 100-year-old cylinder recordings as the starting point for new compositions – chopping them up, reordering them and playing along to build up a series of completely new compositions.

As Lane says “I’ve always liked the idea of collage and often include this in my visual art, so I wanted to do something that incorporated this approach in my music.”

Utilizing a similar construction method to that of The Caretaker, Lane “uses the cylinder recordings to build up each piece on Playing With Ghosts so that it bears little resemblance to the original. If there is any kind of concept to the album it probably centres around the way sound can change over time and as well as people’s perception of the sound. These recordings have obviously deteriorated a lot over the 100 or so years that they have existed, and this has brought out new qualities.”

On the album Lane is joined by Bryan Styles on Clarinet, Mick Gawthorp on Flute and Saxophone, Rei Sugawara and Debbie Lane on Voices, while Adrian Lane uses Piano, Samples, Glockenspiel and Laptop.

“Another Spell than Beauty’s” static and distant sounding piano ring in the track with slow-paced playing that is controlled, gentle and fluent with a healthy dose of mournfulness. Clarinet which sounds like a bed of drones compliments the piano but also gives the piece the nostalgic feeling that the static like crackles throughout the track alludes to. The tone changes once the clarinet comes into play with less a feeling of decay than at the start of the piece and more a hint of haze.

“Playing with Ghosts” a record needle drop with a haunting loop, piano and clarinet combine to form the intro to the track which drops out leaving a bouncy hopeful piano melody before a quick backwards section sees the intro return. After this section both the first two sections join together before dropping out to just the piano before another backwards section introduces static to the mist for a brief part before the intro returns and the music drifts off into the silence. The use of the backwards sections helps transition the piece and brings the listener’s attention to focus.

“Abandoned Equations” degrading crackles meets soaring pianos with a percussive edge. The piano sounds recorded in an abandoned room with its distant edge which gives it a haunted ambience. The repetitive nature of the piece givers it a meditative overview rather than being monotonous.

“Of the Spheres” stark piano paired with the haunting quality of the clarinet which gives it a smoky jazz feel and fits in well with the nostalgic motif. The lines of both the piano and clarinet are long and flowing, intertwining each other. The snippets of voice from Rei Sugawara are very subtle and serve as a bridge between sections.

“A Rainy Beginning” distant rolling field recordings with what sounds like particularly raw piano and a less haunting clarinet give this track a different feel to the previous tracks despite the familiar instrumentation. There is a romantic feel that balances the melancholy, the hauntingness and the starkness with a small dose of hope.

“Retreat Half_Hidden” the clarinet on this particular track has the feel of saxophone in its bluesy playing alongside the minimalist piano and the various sound samples that adorns the track. Samples of fractured electronics crisp in nature give a rustic feel to the track and add an extra dimension to it. While the piano remains the central focus, the layering and flowing clarinet, for me is the focal point.

“Count the Tides” looped recordings of the cylinder recordings that sound manipulated and cut up, float in and out with additional static giving it a bass like bed. Melodious piano fills the next section before electronics signal the loops and joining saxophone brings a different edge to the track. Electronics, drones, chimes enter the sound mix with an increase in the speed of the piano leading the track to its conclusion.

“Conversing in Turn” sees Flute enter the sound palate for the first time which pairs nicely along side the piano. The style of playing is very similar to that of the clarinet, but naturally gives it that breathy ambient touch to the track. In fact this is the first track that leans more in the ambient direction because of the flute and the electronics that are glacial and environment related that creep up towards the end of the track. There is very much a feeling of Déjà vu with this track.

“Father & Son” a collaborative piece between Lane and his seven-year old son Nicholas Lane sees snatches of melody that lie at the outer skirts of the piece alongside a strident piano playing that has intention and comes across as the player is making a strong statement with the force in which they are playing. The snatches of backwards loops glitch in and out adding further texture to a mostly piano dominated piece. The long reverberations also give the piece depth. There is a section were the playing slows down in intention and focuses more on melody and mood which helps join the first and last sections.

“Andante” refers to moderately slow tempo which is not instantly noticeable at the start of the track with the dust soaked ancient looped melodies that fade out like ripples in a pond to be then joined by slow piano. The loops drop out and Clarinet and the introduction of Debbie Lane’s voice (this time more prominent in the mix than Sugawara’s was) take centre place. The clarinet shares a quality with the loops that when they return they are paired perfectly. Muted clarinet alongside soft glitchy rhythms fade out the track.

“To Other Coasts” Flute and Saxophone join alongside Lane’s piano for the opening section. Saxophone gives it the Drone, Flute the breathy ambience and Piano the earthy touch. Another layer to this is the almost imperceptible voice which adds an ambient edge alongside the flute.

“A Nip in the Air” space is explores in this piano based track with minimal accompaniment with exception of some sound sources and a layer of ambient flowing drones with a slight buzz to them as well as chime sounds. It’s almost like the windows have been opened to let the natural ambience in.

“Invisible Near the Rain” Clarinet, long ambience, static and a soundtrack-esque piano line form the basis of this track. The Clarinet’s long drones bring out a layer of melancholy that is opposing the fresh piano feel. The detritus of the cylinder recordings adds a layer of grittiness that compliments the lines of the clarinet which fuels the nostalgia of the piece.

“Make or Mars” smoky noir jazz-like Clarinet briefly sets the tone for this track which follows the theme with the murder-mystery sounding piano keys that are joined by micro samples of little orbiting sounds echoing out into space. The Clarinet returns to emphasize the noir mood giving a sepia appearance to the track which ends with the oscillating sounds.

“Even the Forest” sees the electronic micro samples combine well with the subtle clarinet. The miniature glitches being the tiny sections of cylinder recordings that are mixed in with piano and longer looped sections of cylinder recordings the effective use of the way things are looped and repeated gives it a childlike rhyme feel.

“Amid Tall Dangers” following on the jazz noir feel of the previous track this combines with the loops become an orchestral sounding track. The piano is minimalist , but effective and follows the beat of the music bringing you back to centre. The way the cylinder recordings cut and loop add extra dimension to the music than simply being a base for the music to join.

Lane’s feel for the album was the combination of the past and the present. “The age of the recordings gives a haunting quality  to the music it contains, partly because of the fact that it’s old, but it would have seemed like cutting edge sound for the people who recorded it onto cylinders at the time. I liked the idea of combining this with modern technology and more traditional instrumentation – and what’s interesting is that my upright piano used on the album was built around the same time these cylinder recordings were originally produced.”

To say he has achieved something jaw dropping is an understatement. Any concern you have of it being derivative of The Caretaker are easily forgotten.A special mention should go to his collaborators especially Bryan Styles’ Clarinet, which helps formulate many of the albums tracks. This album was released on August 18 in an edition of 150 copies, I urge you to check it out.

Aiden Baker / Simon Goff/ Thor Harris – Noplace.

When I think of improvised music I tend to think that it falls into 3 groups. One – The group of players are doing their own thing and are seemingly unaware of the players around them, Two – The players are inhabiting their own world but interact with the other players weaving in and of each others sphere much like The Necks do and, Three – Those that are so attune to each other that you’d swear that this is music that was written by the group and tightly rehearsed. The music of “NOPLACE” easily falls into the third category.

Noplace is an improvised collaboration between Aidan Baker (Nadja / Caudal / B/B/S/), Simon Goff (Molecular, Bee & Flower) and Thor Harris (Swans, Shearwater, Thor & Friends). Having known each other for a number of years and previously contributed to one another’s recordings this trio finally came together as a whole on May 7th 2017 at Redrum Studios in Berlin. In a short, improvised session of just a few hours they set about laying down as much material as possible which was then subsequently edited and re-worked (without overdubs) to form this album.

The album art was done by Christopher Hefner another musical artist they have worked with before. Gizeh Records describe the music as a hypnotic and deep listen. Kinetic rhythms pulsate throughout whilst the guitar and violin jostle and weave around the metronomic beats, creating a cathartic and all-encompassing experience. The very nature of the instrumental repetitions give it an immediate avant/krautrock feel but the whole record is coated in a wonderful psychedelic atmosphere that’s both melodic, textured and innovative.”

Using a simple sound source of instruments such as Guitar, Drums and Violin the trio create a world of sound. “Noplace I” opens the album with the center being Harris’ tribal jazz-like drumming that is hypnotic and gives Baker’s guitar and Goff’s Violin a base to attach to and allows them to run across weaving lines of guitar and violin in drone like and feedback fashion. The violin and guitar aren’t used in typical fashion and use more in a melodic colorful way.

“Noplace II” takes the music into the more experimental realm with minimal cymbal dominated percussion, spindly guitar work and arcing violin cutting in and out. There is a hypnotic loop feel to the track that also comes across assoundtrack-esque. With the first piece being centered on drums, the change see the guitar and violins become the focal point of the track. There is an ominous edge to the instrumentation with sharp sounds being created by Goff welding to the darker tones conjured by Baker and Harris’ exercise in subtlety. You can image a track like this being extending into a solid hour hour piece.

“Red Robin” starts with Baker’s guitar that has a looping insistent almost art punk/post punk feel to it, with a classic drum section from Harris that could easily sit in either trip hop or post rock circles while Goff surveys the top section of the soundscape with barely reminiscent violin. This track comes across as the most layered. While the guitar and drums remain the same through out (with some subtler variation), other guitar section, effects and layering of instruments appear appear. There is a futuristic appeal to the track that leads it other directions than just the “rock format” that is its foundation.

“Noplace III” comes across as an ambient techno track , but one done without synths. The bass beat shuffled cymbals give the track it’s feel, but the guitar drones, spindly section and violin drones gives it the ambient element. The drones have both light and dark feel with the darker end have a bass feel vaguely reminiscent of an instrument like the didgeridoo. The fact that this is constructed without synths shows the way that the players can use their chosen instruments in a way to create textures that are not always ascribed to their instrument. If you told someone they would be listening to music constructed by Guitar, Violin and Drums, they would be pleasantly surprised by this.

“Tin Chapel” sees spindly Asian style guitar working alongside post rock style jazzy percussion with violin that makes me think of a combination of Egyptian and Jazz music. The drums drive the track and the guitar adds an intensity to the piece which is a swirling one, but the focal point is the violin which is used as the lead instrument. There is a section of stacatto violin playing which is in contrast to the drones built up and the and krautrock motorik percussion which drives the track. There is a balance of the structured and unstructured music in the track which comes across in a way of a power play in which element will win over.

“Northplace” starts with ominous affected fuzz guitar, pounding fluttering drums, long arcing violin drones and distorted shimmering guitars. The foot is definitely entrenched in the avant scene as the elements pound away, cutting in and out, building up and disappearing. The focal point changes early on from the percussion being the focal point to the guitar lines and distorted violin that is either droning or cutting up the sound leading through to darker ambient territory, albeit with conventional instruments.

“Nighplace” brings Dirty Three vibe to the with the brushed drums, southern style violin and minimal guitar lines (with maximal sound). It makes sense that this is the final track as it is more reflective than to those that have preceded it. The drums have a rustic feel while Baker and Goff work in tandem to color the piece with drones that at times are widescreen in their coverage. A section of distorted guitar gives a dirty bass element which gives an extra bottom layer to the track the introduction of this appears just before the intensity of the drone element increases to the point where it threatens to take over the track and for a moment the drums get lost in this sound.

It is quite amazing to think that this was recorded in a short period of time on one day, edited and re-assembled and then some six months later sounding like a fully formed album from an established group. Aiden Baker, Simon Goff and Thor Harris have produced a very enjoyable, rich album that thanks to Gizeh Records we are able to appreciate.